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The passing of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

The University of Oxford is deeply saddened to learn of the death of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. The University enjoyed a close relationship with the Queen throughout her reign and gives thanks for her 70 years of service to the nation.

Malaria booster vaccine continues to meet WHO-specified 75% efficacy goal

Researchers from the University of Oxford and their partners have today reported new findings from their Phase 2b trial following the administration of a booster dose of the candidate malaria vaccine, R21/Matrix-M™ – which previously demonstrated high-level efficacy of 77% over the following 12 months in young west African children in 2021. In their findings (reported in The Lancet Infectious Diseases), they found that a vaccine booster dose at one year following a primary three-dose regime maintained high efficacy against malaria, and continued to meet the World Health Organization’s Malaria Vaccine Technology Roadmap goal of a vaccine with at least 75% efficacy.

More than 10 million children were affected by COVID-19-associated parental and caregiver deaths

According to a new modelling study, published in JAMA Pediatrics, the number of children estimated to have experienced the death of a parent or caregiver as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic has climbed to more than 10.5 million globally as of May 1, 2022.

Genetic mapping of tumours reveals how cancers grow

Researchers from the University of Oxford, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Science for Life Laboratory, and the Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden, have found that individual prostate tumours contain a previously unknown range of genetic variation.

Tackling suicide risk in people with mental disorders

Clinical researchers from Oxford University’s Department of Psychiatry and Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust have developed guidance to help clinicians identify and treat patients at risk of suicide.

Antimicrobial resistant bacteria found in newborn children from low- and middle-income countries

Sepsis is a primary cause of mortality in newborns, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). A new study coordinated by Professor Tim Walsh at the Ineos Oxford Institute for Antimicrobial Research (IOI) and Department of Biology looks at the links between the presence of bacteria resistant to antibiotics isolated from mothers and their newborn babies living across 7 LMICs in Africa and South Asia. They show that antimicrobial resistant bacteria are present in neonates after just a few hours of life, and find examples of transmission of sepsis-causing resistant bacteria within hospitals and from mothers to babies.

Viral role in Alzheimer's Disease discovered

Researchers from Oxford’s Institute of Population Ageing, Tufts University and the University of Manchester have discovered that common viruses appear to play a role in some cases of Alzheimer’s disease (AD).

Professor Hugh Watkins wins £30 million research award to cure killer heart diseases

The British Heart Foundation award aims to help researchers rewrite DNA, in “defining moment” for cardiovascular medicine.

Researchers develop new breath-driven concept set to transform access to hand prosthetics

The new air-powered hand provides a lightweight, low-maintenance and easy-to-use body-powered prosthetic option particularly well suited for children and those in low and middle-income countries.

New rabies vaccine candidate demonstrates promising immune response and safety

Researchers from the University of Oxford have today reported new findings from a Phase 1 clinical trial studying the immune response and safety of their newly-developed single shot rabies vaccine, ChAdOx2 RabG - with promising results identified.

Gaming does not appear harmful to mental health, unless the gamer can't stop - Oxford study

Societies may tremble when a hot new video game is released, but the hours spent playing popular video games do not appear to be damaging players’ mental health, according to the largest-ever survey of nearly 40,000 gamers and their gaming habits, which was conducted over six weeks by a team from Oxford’s Internet Institute. That does not mean, however, that the research did not throw up some concerns – and, the team argues, much more information is needed before tech regulators, can really rest easy.

Genetic study provides evidence that alcohol accelerates biological ageing

The short-term effects of excessive drinking are well known, but to date it has been less certain whether alcohol also accelerates the aging process.

More children aged 8-17 trying to lose weight than a decade ago, including children of a healthy weight

Over a quarter (26.5%) of children reported trying to lose weight between 2015 and 2016, a 5% increase over 1997 and 1998, finds new research from the University of Oxford.

Oxford Science Enterprises raises £250 million to support University innovations

New funding will drive the creation and growth of transformational businesses built on ground-breaking Oxford research.

New study evaluates pharmacological treatment for insomnia

Two drugs, eszopiclone and lemborexant – both not currently licenced for the treatment of insomnia in the UK – were shown to perform better than others, both in the acute and long-term treatment of insomnia in adults, according to a new Oxford study exploring the pharmacological management of insomnia.

Oxford vaccine saved most lives in its first year of rollout

When the University of Oxford developed a vaccine that was effective against COVID-19, ensuring that it could be rolled out globally and in perpetuity for low- and middle-income countries was of paramount importance.

Early life infection increases sensitivity to pain in newborn babies

Researchers from Oxford’s Department of Paediatrics have discovered that infection can increase a baby’s sensitivity to pain, which may last longer than the infection.

New cross-disciplinary medical research building opens in Oxford

The University of Oxford's newest research institute, the Institute of Developmental & Regenerative Medicine (IDRM), has been officially opened, launching the first institute of its kind in the world to physically merge developmental biology and regenerative medicine to treat some of the world's most prolific diseases.

How effective is school-based mindfulness training?

A standardised schools-based mindfulness training programme did not help young people’s mental health and well-being overall, but did improve school culture and reduce teachers’ burn out, a research team led by the University of Oxford has found.

Oxford researchers become EMBO members

Three University of Oxford academics have become the latest to join the 1,900 eminent life scientists in Europe and beyond that make up the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO).

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