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HIFs inhibit SARS-CoV-2 infection of lung epithelial cells

Activation of hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) by either hypoxia or drug treatment inhibits SARS-CoV-2 entry and replication in lung epithelial cells, raising the potential of using clinically licensed HIF activators to prevent and/or treat COVID-19.

New target identified to develop treatment for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm OXFORD SCIENCE BLOG

31 Mar 2021 By Talitha Smith, Communications Officer, Department of Physiology Anatomy and Genetics (DPAG)

Scientists confirm bacteria’s genetic ‘Swiss army knife’ is key driver of antibiotic resistance

Antibiotic resistance is a huge challenge facing society globally, posing a threat not only to human health but in areas such as food security and the economy. The more we know about the mechanisms behind antibiotic resistance, the better we can respond to these threats. New research, published in eLife, by scientists at the University of Oxford and Universidad Complutense de Madrid has confirmed that one of those mechanisms – driven by a sophisticated genetic system known as an integron – plays a key role in accelerating resistance and gives bacteria an ‘incredible opportunity’ to evolve in response to antibiotic treatment.

New study shows overwhelming public support for donating vaccines to low-income countries

A survey led by the University of Oxford has found that most people in high-income countries support donating some of their country’s COVID-19 vaccine supplies to low-income nations who would otherwise struggle to gain access.

Oxford researchers create online resource to optimise NHS routes for housebound vaccinations

Two engineering DPhil students from the University of Oxford have created a website for GP surgeries across the UK to optimise the delivery of Covid-19 vaccinations to the UK’s 1 million housebound patients.

Oxford University researchers release cheap, quick COVID-19 antibody test

The new easy-to-produce test detects coronavirus spike-protein binding antibodies in people who have tested positive for COVID-19.

University of Oxford to study nasal administration of COVID-19 vaccine

The University of Oxford is launching a study investigating the delivery of the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 coronavirus vaccine using a nasal spray.

AstraZeneca publish primary analysis from US trial of coronavirus vaccine

- Primary analysis, part of pre-specified trial protocol, follows interim analysis on Monday 22 March - Data are consistent with interim analysis, and will form submission by AstraZeneca to US FDA - Vaccine 76% effective against symptomatic COVID-19, and 100% effective against severe or critical disease and hospitalisation

New partnership enables access to state-of-the-art radiotherapy machine in Oxford

The new ViewRay MRIdian machine is the first of its kind in the UK and will help to improve challenging cancer treatment through faster, tailored radiotherapy.

Marking 100 years of the tuberculosis BCG vaccine

The VALIDATE Network, a community of over 400 researchers based in more than 200 research institutions in 63 countries, will today launch the “BCG100 Programme” marking the centenary of the Bacille Calmette-Guérin Vaccine for tuberculosis.

The RECOVERY Trial: One year on

The Randomised Evaluation of COVid-19 thERapY (RECOVERY) trial was officially launched on 23 March 2020. It is the world's largest COVID-19 drug trial.

USA, Chile and Peru interim trial data show Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine is safe and highly effective

- Oxford-AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine 79% effective against symptomatic COVID-19 overall - Vaccine 100% effective against severe or critical symptomatic COVID-19 - No safety concerns reported

Existing vaccines may protect against the Brazilian coronavirus variant

Scientists at the University of Oxford have released pre-print data measuring the level of antibodies that can neutralise – or stop infection from – variants that are circulating in South Africa, Brazil and elsewhere.

PRINCIPLE Covid-19 treatments trial widens to under 50s and adds colchicine

From 3rd March 2021, the UK’s national priority platform trial of Covid-19 treatments for recovery at home launched its investigation of the gout drug colchicine, and expands for the first time to include adults of any age.

Regular meat consumption linked with a wide range of common diseases

Regular meat consumption is associated with a range of diseases that researchers had not previously considered, according to a large, population-level study conducted by a team at the University of Oxford.

New data show vaccines reduce severe COVID-19 in older adults

New data show both Oxford / AstraZeneca vaccine and the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines significantly reduce severe COVID-19 in older adults.

Singula Bio, a new Oxford spin-out company - Cancer need not be fatal

Singula Bio, a bold new seed-stage biotechnology company spun out of Oxford University, has been launched with the intention of helping show that cancer need not be fatal. Led by three Oxford cancer specialists, the firm is aims to become a world leader in therapies to use against difficult-to-treat solid malignancies such as ovarian cancer - using the body’s own immune system to fight previously fatal cancers.

Major rise in public support for COVID vaccine – Oxford study

More than three quarters of people in the UK now say they are ’very likely’ to have the vaccine – up from 50% among the same group of survey respondents five months ago –according to a two-wave Oxford University survey published today.

Coronavirus vaccination linked to substantial reduction in hospitalisation, real-world data suggests

The first study to describe the effects in real-world communities of the Oxford coronavirus vaccine has been reported in a pre-print publication today, showing a clear reduction in the risk of hospitalisation from COVID-19 amongst those who have received the vaccine.

Vaccine passports can work but face 12 challenges

COVID-19 vaccine passports could be created, but significant challenges need to be overcome first, according to a report today from a panel led by Oxford Professors Melinda Mills and Chris Dye, which outlines a dozen issues which must be addressed before passports can be introduced.

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